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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
begins, it's late july, 1992, and i'm on a flight from washington, d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an intern that summer up on capitol hill, and one of my regrets of the summer was that i'd never seen strom thurmond. because all my fellow interns said you've got to see strom thurmond. he such an unusual appearance about him. i did know what they meant really your but i had my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and a look ahead in front of me and i see a man who's got kind of orange colored hair practically, so brightly colored. first generation hair plugs. shows you how slow i am that i think to myself, that must be what strom thurmond's head looks like. then, of course, it wasn't strom thurmond. i knew that when people reaching over trying to shake his hand. i wanted to shake his hand, too, because i'd been in d.c. that summer for the first time, and i met all of these politicians i've seen a tv. i was about to go home and speak to my dads rotary club and i wanted to tell them all about the famous people i met up in washington, d.c. and so i was going to try to shake his ha
and is reported favorably by the senate judiciary committee last july. i hope senators will support it. i'm leave pleased that senatorse joined me as cosponsors of this amendment. i call on all senators who talk about accountability and oversight to join with us to adopt this better approach to ensuring our security and our privacy. in june, after the senate intelligence committee originated the senate bill to reauthorize and extend fisa, senator grassley and i asked for a sequential referral, one that would allow the judiciary committee to consider and improve this important legislation, which under the rules we could. the bill that was approved by the intelligence committee provided for a general and really unfettered extension of the expired provisions until june 2017. i hope that we could approve that and we did. i worked with the distinguished chair of the senate intelligence committee to craft a compromise to assure the extension until 2015 you go also add some -- but also add some accountability in the overite oversight provision. i appreciated the senator from california's help and strong
. [video clip] >> we took that vote back on july 25. it did not originate in the house. it has no chance of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is fo
in july and is the first youtube video to hit 1 billion hits. and off this one song he purchased a home in l.a., cash money, $1.5 million. we can just move on and hopefully gungnam style will go out of style in 2013. >>> rolling stones' ronnie wood just got married to this young lady who is 34. they just got married. congratulations. and they're going to start a family. so we could see a baby on the rolling stores tour with mick and -- >> wow. rolling stone, indeed. 64? >> 64 and 35. >> yeah, dude, he's a rock star. these how rock stars roll. can't hate him for that. >>> this is a big story. we want to give a congratulations to our favorite weatherman sam champion. he got married last week to his partner, ruben. it was a small ceremony here in manhattan. and robin roberts was there, looking great, bouncing back, the whole am there. it's time to change the way we clean. it's time to free ourselves from the smell and harshness of bleach. and free ourselves from worrying about the ones we love. new lysol power & free has more cleaning power than bleach. how? the secret is the hydrogen pero
of the preannouncement. if you bought the stock the last time ceo was on in july, you have lost 19%. so where do we go from here? let's check in with vivek ranadive, founder and chairman of tibco software. let's find out about the quarter and company's prospects. welcome back to the show. >> jim, thank you for having me. it's always a pleasure to be on. >> all right. when things are great, we say how come they were so great, what happened? you were very candid on your call. what went wrong and how are you fixing it? >> well, jim, we failed to execute in north america in our core business. it was entirely our fault. no excuses. we have made a leadership change and that takes effect starting now. but there were parts of our business that were very strong. we closed ads 6 million deal with the spanish bank. visual analytics were up. there's no question there is strong demand for our products. we failed to execute in certain areas. >> okay. there was one -- i know everyone knows the federal government is having a tough time. they seem to have spent less with you than they did previously. the federal gover
, for better and some for worse. july 1776, the american founding fathers' decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine the process of making a tough decisi decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage, about corporate decisions and personal ones. from taking down the most wanted man in the world -- >> the president turned to us and said i made my decision. we're going to go with a raid. write up the orders. >> to giving up a dream career. >> it was this sense of almost unreality, of just i'm not sure i know who i am. >> to uprooting a company culture. >> some people actually quit. >> to opening the door to a closed society. this is like a spy thriller. >> absolutely. >> each of my guests has wrestled with a difficult choice. they will take us through their deliberations, their fears, and how they made their tough decisions. >>> at 11:
to montgomery. on july 6, 1964, he led 50 african americans to the courthouse in selma, alabama, on voter registration day, but sheriff jim clark arrested them rather than allow them to apply to vote. i played for congressman lewis a clip of his close friend and ally, martin luther king jr., speaking in 1965 about jim clark. rev. martin luther king jr.: i am here to tell you tonight that the businessmen, the mayor of this city, the police commissioner of this city, and everybody in the white power structure of this city must take a responsibility for everything that jim clark does in this community. it's time for us to say to these men, that if you don't do something about it, we will have no alternative but to engage in broader and more drastic forms of civil disobedience in order to bring the attention of the nation to this whole issue in selma, alabama. amy goodman: dr. martin luther king. you were in the church, john lewis. rep. john lewis: it was an unbelievable speech. dr. king spoke out of his gut. sheriff clark was a very mean man. he was vicious. i think maybe he was a little sic
. peaked in july 2006, in part because they did a 5-1 split. even though they weren't supposed to do anything this encouraged people who had been in hansen a long time to take it off the table. and it picked up its fourth analyst, may 10, 2006 when goldman started covering the stock. two months to sell between goldman's initiation and the stock peak. prudence dictated we sell once the stock had four analysts. better to clear out early with inning than to wait for them to fade away. hansen and all other hot stocks started to cool off. and incredibly after hansen fell off the radar screen, and the active analyst coverage dwindled, the stock dwindled. an amazing ren nance, and when analysts stop following the company, but the company's earnings start speculating as the case with hansen in 2011, a storied lazarus like move can happen. especially when monster ended up vanquishing the competition, when everyone said would wipe out monster, but didn't materialize, after the dramatic fall from grace, they renamed the company monster. you must know when to sell and that comes when you see too
was turning out to be really hard. july 1776 by december had turned into a editor, painful, depressive, demoralizing series. in washington rewrite a pamphlet called the crisis, which begins these are the times. washington understood the first you win the argument menu in the word. people had to believe. i came here to say to you, we have no reason to despair. you have no reason to back off. you have no reason. we have every reason to behave this parents. any questions? [applause] [applause] >> said the speaker has been kind enough to give us an temper questions than answers. if you have one come raise your hand. if you could wait to leak at the in your hand, so everyone can hear it, that would be great. we will start over here. >> first of all, mr. speaker, i'd like to congratulate you in thank you for coming out and be demanded to read that his willing to fight the good fight. we appreciate that. [applause] and i agree with you that we have also her, we've lost the battle we have to continue to pay. some of the things we should all think about going forward is a need to make sure the
we have for advertising and push it forward into june and july to define him in the battleground states. other candidates, bill clinton in $100 million we have for 1996, did the same thing. this was a real gamble. but it really paid off. the romney folks are never able to recover. the definition that the obama people had established with the dominant one in the campaign. host: this is from "the boston sunday globe." two days before election day and then the piece goes on to say, looking back, to your point, the candidate never defining himself. and then overestimating his ground game. on the ground game side, they were worth about their own bravado about their own organization. part of it was, i think, a genuine ignorance about what president obama had going on. the romney campaign had a triple a round game. obama campaigned out a ground game that was led the 1927 yankees. it was up against a perhaps all- time great ground game. i do not think the romney folks appreciated that. a lot of the post-mortem pieces that we have done, talking about the obama ground game -- part of it is
to remove galstones and these are the most recent pictures only him taken in july by cnn at his 94th birthday party in 'tis home surrounded by his large family. but he looked bewildered and didn't smile. so different to the vigorous man who fought so hard, endured so much. other recent years, though, the former south african president has seemed frail and unsteady on his legs. public appearances became increasingly rare. just too much effort for a man in his 90s. those he did make, mandela sometimes dozed off during speeches and seemed confused. he's mostly spent his time at this home in the eastern cape. soothed by the slow pace of the rural rhythms in the hills near his boyhood village and it's unclear whelp and if he'll return back to his primary residence here. for now, though, south africans are just relieved that he's out of hospital. >> mandela, he's alive. >> i can see that. >> i'm worried about this. at least if he can manage to reach at least it, that would be grateful. >> reporter: a man who gave so much and who is still so deeply revered by anxious south africans. you jus
victims. >> seven down! >> july 20th, just past midnight, terror inside theater nine. >> aurora, colorado, nine miles east of denver, where there has been a mass shooting at a movie theater. >> prosecutores say james holmes donned protective gear, threw tear gas and began firing. in the end, 12 people killed, 58 others wounded. holmes faces 152 charges. many victims continue to recover, while others will never recover the loss they suffered that night. and number one -- >> unimaginable horror grips the nation in one of the deadliest school shootings in u.s. history. >> tragedy at sandy hook elementary. >> this is unspeakable what happened in this town. >> innocent children shot dead in their classrooms. the victims, 16 6-year-olds, 4 7-year-olds with 6 adults. >> emilie's laughter was infectious and all those who had a pleasure to meet her would agree this world is a better place because she's been in it. >> in newtown, connecticut, an outpouring of kindness and compassion, while a nation faced hard questions about mental health and guns. as the president issued an emotional call for acti
attack. tell us about your injuries. >> july 2011. i lost my left leg completely the worst part was the inection ifs i spent seven months in the hospital battling those. >> you were seven months in the hospital and as soon as you arrived back herance i understand it on u.s. soil you were 53 days in the intensive care unit. and christina, you were by his side. >> yeah. >> the entire time. >> yes. >> every day. that couldn't have been easy. >> no, but i mean when somebody you care about is that sick what do you do? you don't walk away. >> she dropped everything like quit school. left her job. she take care of me. >> you guys are young. it's incredible to have this experience and to have this level of dedication to each other at this age. have you been through a real trial. so, derek, what did you think last week when you heard that you had won this contest for your dream wedding? >> i guess the past 17 months have been all about me. i know it's our wedding but now it's time for the next chapter where she is in the focus. >> what's your dream wedding going to include? >> everything
of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. to see how money is cspent, and to control how it should be
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)